Laser Therapy

LASER

Smithfield Animal Hospital Is Excited To Offer Our Patients Companion Therapy Laser!

Laser therapy provides a non-invasive, pain-free, surgery-free, and drug-free treatment of a variety of conditions. Animals can experience relief and/or improvement within hours depending on the condition and the pet’s unique health status. These treatments can provide our patients with increased mobility, faster wound healing, and speedier post surgical rehabilitation.

Laser therapy is also being used after most surgeries to help speed up your pet’s recovery. The laser does not cause pain, if anything it relaxes and comforts. So, when trying to decide the best option for your animal; ask our doctors about the therapy laser. Whether your pet is rehabilitating from trauma or injury, healing from wounds, or simply aging, your companion can benefit from this innovative approach to treating pain.


What Advantages Does Therapy Laser Have Over Other Types Of Treatment?

  • No side-effects associated with laser therapy.Adverse reactions may occur when NSAIDs are used to control chronic pain in dogs and cats long term.
  • Less time spent in the veterinary clinic for you and your pet. Therapy laser treatments take only a few minutes.
  • Yearly blood work is not required for therapy laser treatment, whereas blood work must be repeated yearly while on NSAIDs to monitor the effect on the liver and kidneys.
  • No anesthesia required. The treatment is painless. Many pets relax or fall asleep while receiving their treatment.
  • Can be combined with other treatments. Laser treatment can be provided in conjunction with the existing treatment protocol and pain medications may be able to be decreased.
  • When Is Therapy Laser Beneficial?

  • Treatment of arthritis, degenerative joint disease, or hip dysplasia
  • General pain management (sprains, strains, and stiffness)
  • Post-surgery pain(spays, neuters)
  • Skin problems(hot spots, lick granulomas, infections)
  • Dental procedures
  • Fractures and wounds(bites, abrasions, burns, and lesions)
  • Ear infections

  • how Does Therapy Laser Work?

    Laser therapy stimulates the body to heal from within. Laser therapy is not based on development of heat, but on photochemical effects in cells and tissue. Laser light positively stimulates the functions of injured cells, and increases the metabolism within the cell. This means even if the cell is damaged and inflamed it can heal quicker with laser therapy. Even if the cell has degenerative changes (such as arthritis) it can recharge itself with energy and begin to heal. This results in relief from pain, increased circulation, reduced inflammation, and an acceleration of the healing process.

    What You Can Expect When We Treat Your Pet?

  • Treatments generally take less than ten minutes.
  • Your pet will feel no pain or unpleasant sensations during treatment. After about 5 minutes of treatment the body starts to release endorphins, a chemical released by the body that has a relaxing effect on the body, and also helps to reduce pain. Most of them relax and panting decreases while treatments are performed.
  • You may be able to hold your pet while the treatment is performed.
  • Unfortunately we cannot cure chronic conditions like arthritis, but 6 Laser treatments over a 3 week period can give relief for 4-12 weeks. A single booster treatment when needed gives another 4 to 12 weeks relief. The treatment regimen and schedule will vary with the condition and be personalized by your pet’s doctor.
  • Many patients show some improvement within 24 hours of the first treatment although some need several treatments to improve; the effects are cumulative.

  • Signs That Your Senior Pet Is In Pain And May Benefit From Companion Laser Therapy

  • Circling multiple times before lying down
  • Abnormal posture when sitting or lying down
  • Restlessness
  • Whining, groaning or other vocalizations                                                                                                                                                                                                          
  • Limping
  • Difficulty or inability to get in/out of car or up/down stairs
  • Lack of grooming
  • Doesn’t wag his/her tail much anymore
  • Licking or biting a particular area of body frequently
  • Lack of appetite
  • Trembling

    SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT HERE

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    Office Hours

    Monday:

    8:00 AM-6:00 PM

    Tuesday:

    8:00 AM-6:00 PM

    Wednesday:

    8:00 AM-6:00 PM

    Thursday:

    8:00 AM-6:00 PM

    Friday:

    8:00 AM-6:00 PM

    Saturday:

    8:00 AM-12:00 PM

    Sunday:

    Closed

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    Testimonials

    • "I took my 12 week old puppy in today and was very impressed with the care given to him. The ladies at the front desk were so friendly and welcoming. The vet answered all of my questions, was patient, and really seemed to care about my puppy. Having been to another clinic in the area, I was pleased with not only the care, but also the value. Thanks for the excellent service."
      Colleen W.
    • "Mr Boo Boo loves all his friends at SAH.. They take really good care of him."
      Brenda M.

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